10 Thoughts You Have Driving Around Your Hometown On Winter Break

10 Thoughts You Have Driving Around Your Hometown On Winter Break

It's good to be back home, right?

53
views

Now that the holiday season is here, and many college students have finished their finals, those students are probably now back in their hometowns. Ah, being home. That can bring back either great memories or memories that should not be brought back except when you're out for drinks with friends and you're reminiscing about the old days. But what about those thoughts when one might just be going for a drive?

Well, whenever I go for a drive around my small hometown of Avon, here are 10 thoughts that come up.

1. Wow, I haven't driven in a while.

I don't have my car with me on campus.

2. Alright, one-woman concerts here I go.

I NEED YOU, GIRL!

3. Wait, when was that added to town?

When did we get a Swenson's?

4. It feels weird that I'm driving around while everyone in the school district is still in school.

Until next week.

5. OK, I want lunch but where?

What restaurants are here again?

6. Hey, person in front of me, the light is green!

Trying not to road rage...

7. Oh look there's that one place where (insert memory here).

The one place where we went to hang out after football games, where we went to shop, the memories are endless.

8. Wait I got to go back to high school...

At least it's only to go pick up my brother.

9. I always really found driving peaceful.

I'm glad I got to do this drive...

10. But I still have to pick up my brother...

He's getting the car tomorrow.

Popular Right Now

A Letter To My Freshman Dorm Room As I Pack Up My Things

Somehow a 15' x 12' room became a home.

5677
views

Dear Geary 411,

With your creaky beds, concrete walls, and mismatched tile floors, you are easily overlooked as just another room we were randomly assigned to— but you were different. Inside your old walls, I have made some of the best memories of my life that I will hold on to forever.

Thank you for welcoming my neighbors in with open arms who quickly became friends who didn't knock and walked in like you were their own.

I feel like an apology is needed.

We're sorry for blaring the music so loud while getting ready and acting like we can actually sing when, in reality, we know we can't. Sorry for the dance parties that got a bit out of control and ended with us standing on the desks. Sorry for the cases of the late-night giggles that came out of nowhere and just would not go away. Sorry for the homesick cries and the "I failed my test" cries and the "I'm dropping out" cries. We're sorry for hating you at first. All we saw was a tiny and insanely hot room, we had no idea what you would bring to us.

Thank you for providing me with memories of my first college friends and college experiences.

As I stand at the door looking at the bare room that I first walked into nine months ago I see so much more than just a room. I see lots and lots of dinners being eaten at the desks filled with stories of our days. I see three girls sitting on the floor laughing at God knows what. I see late night ice cream runs and dance battles. I see long nights of homework and much-needed naps. Most importantly, I look at the bed and see a girl who sat and watched her parents leave in August and was absolutely terrified, and as I lock you up for the last time today, I am so proud of who that terrified girl is now and how much she has grown.

Thank you for being a space where I could grow, where I was tested physically, mentally and emotionally and for being my home for a year.

Sincerely,

A girl who is sad to go

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

This Is The Love-Hate Story Of Midwesterners And Snow

if you know, you know.

146
views

Snow, the true definition of love and hate.

If you grew up in the midwest, you know the feeling you got as a kid the night before a snowstorm. When you would stay up a little later in hopes that school will be canceled even before you go to bed. You know the feeling of waking up to a 2-hr delay and getting some extra sleep. Though nothing beat waking up to a closed school. You knew that meant more sleep and a day of sledding, and you were so there for it.

The love you wish to feel now. That your job will call and you just might not have to go in. The feeling of staying home and catching up on things there. Almost comforting that you'll get to sleep in a bit, in the middle of the week! Wow, what a feeling of joy that is. What love you have for the snow that you hope will be coming.

The heart-warming feeling you get as you watch the weather forecast and peep out the window to see snow gracefully falling down to save the day.

You go to bed, ready to receive that phone call the following morning, saying you get to stay home.

Then you wake up.

That's when the hate sets in. No phone calls. Not your school listed on the news as closed. You peek outside and see a thin layer of snow, filling you with disappointment. You know now, that you've been let down once again.

That promising day you thought you would have and then BOOM. You have to get ready for the day. Have to get ready to face the snow. You walk out and the bitter cold that would have brought you happiness at some point, slaps you in the face.

You don't know who to blame for this hurt you feel. The weatherman, that you literally don't know how they still have their job? Your school that decided it was worth the risk? Yourself, for thinking it could actually happen?

That moment where it felt like you were the only school that didn't get closed, just like when you were a kid, the disappointment sets in… no betrayal hurts more than that.

You know now that your butt is the one that will have to walk, what feels like 5 miles, to a class that you don't understand how you even got stuck taking it. All because you hoped that wishing for snow would save the day.

The realization sets in that what you once thought was full of joy and activities, is no longer that for an adult.

Related Content

Facebook Comments