10 Things You're Feeling At The End Of The Semester as an English/Literature Major

10 Things You're Feeling At The End Of The Semester as an English/Literature Major

SO.MANY.PAPERS

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We may not have as many exams, but the paper load evens that out.

1. So.Many.Papers

2. Having to do an exam AND a paper

3. Deadlines

4. Your friends asking you to revise their papers

5. Still doing readings

6. Still having to work on a thesis

7. Presentations galore

8. Just wanting to be home already, cuddled up with a book for enjoyment

9. Living on stress and caffeine (lots of it)

10. But then you're finally free!

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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In College, Money Trumps Intellect And Takes Away Opportunity

College admissions are all about how smart you are, right?

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A student finishes high school with top honors in their class. They apply for the best schools, hoping they will get accepted into the school of their dreams.

Sadly, that acceptance letter never comes. All of the open spots have been taken up by students who were a better fit for the school. That student should have done better, otherwise, they would have gotten accepted... right?

Wrong.

This week, a massive college scandal has come out to the public. According to NBC NEWS, Nearly 800 Parents are connected in a to using their wealth, rather than their child's cognitive abilities, as a means to put their children into Ivy League schools. Prestigious institutions like Yale, Georgetown, and USC have all been found complicit in accepting bribes in amounts up to $6 million dollars to allow their children to attend.

It did not matter what grades the students had, or the number of deserving students who were bumped out of the admissions cycle. All that mattered was the amount of money given to the school.

The probe so far has found 750 families using their money to get their kids into schools, rather than the scholastic merit of the students themselves.

Naturally, outrage has begun to permeate throughout the college discourse. Questions are being raised and re-raised as to what was going on to allow this to happen. Who is responsible? Who are the children who benefited? Who was shafted as a result?

As the weeks go on, more information is going to come out as to how these "prestigious" universities allowed completely unethical methods in getting these students admitted. It will be very interesting to see how much further this scandal goes. I'm willing to bet there will be more names that come out, as well as more schools. (Update: More names have come out)

That is, of course, if the media keeps up with the story.

There is a very good possibility that this scandal could get buried in the press. While this story is a hot button topic right now, another simple story could make major news outlets look away from this scandal and onto another.

Luckily, the internet is full of past, current, and future college alums who see this as a slap in the face to all of the nights that were sacrificed to studying for a good grade. And they're right in feeling that way - who wouldn't, seeing kids with rich parents pay for their place in the school, while you worked your butt off for your hard-earned place?

If all it takes is a large sum of money to get into college, it simply becomes a game of who in the small group is wealthier than the other. One last question, Are the degrees that were obtained in ill gotten ways still valid? Can it be proven that the students actually did the work required for a degree? Luckily, a lot of people other than me want that question answered as well.

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